Monday, August 31, 2009

Fretwork Doll Chair Scroll Saw Pattern

This little doll chair is 6" tall. The construction is slot and tab so it's easy to assemble. The chair is made from 1/4" wood so you can easily stack cut the two arm pieces and cut the project faster.

Contest Update:
The drawing is less than a week away so if you have not entered remember to go the contest area on the blog and sign up. There are only a few hundred entries so your odds are pretty good.

I have had a few readers outside the continental U.S. ask if they could enter the scroll saw giveaway contest if they provided a U.S. shipping address. That is fine. Just understand that the box is almost 50lbs.





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Sunday, August 30, 2009

B-24 Liberator Scroll Saw Pattern



The B-24 Liberator heavy bomber is often compared to the B-17 Flying Fortress. The B-24 was a more modern design with a higher top speed, greater range and a higher bomb load. Unfortunately she had a tendency to catch fire and sustain more damage during combat than the B-17. Even though her reputaions may not have been up to the B-17 she still carried out many important missions because of her long range and load capabilities.





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P-51 Mustang Scroll Saw Pattern


In my opinion the most beautiful airplane ever built. The P-51 Mustang was the best fighter of WWII. Generally used as bomber escort in Germany it was very capable of other missions as well. The P-51 also flew in the Korean war but was mostly limited to ground strikes after the introduction of jet fighters.






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Saturday, August 29, 2009

Pocket Watch and Holder Scroll Saw Pattern

You need a mini clock insert Woodcraft part #125116 and a pocket watch pull and chain kit. Woodcraft part #145955. You can find these online at Woodcraft.

Try to do a very nice sand job on the watch body. It needs to be rounded over to make it feel like a pocket watch.

It's best to use a 1 3/8" forstner bit to drill the hole for the clock insert and a 2 1/8" forstner bit for the holder. The holes will look much better than if you try to cut them on the scroll saw.

Pre-drill the hole for the watch pull. I used a 1/8" drill bit. Be careful when you screw in the pull so you don't split the watch body.

Note the angle of the watch holder. You can cut the angle or use a bench top power sander and sand it to the correct angle. That's how I did it. Either way works.

The pocket watch pull and chain kit cost $4.99 and the insert was 9.99. You can easily find the insert cheaper online. I think this would make a very nice gift for under $20 and they are easy to make. The only challenge is getting the watch body sanded evenly and rounded.

This has turned out to be one of my favorite projects. Easy to make, very little wood, cheap and it looks expensive. I'll be interested to hear what you guys think.



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Friday, August 28, 2009

Linked Bracelet Scroll Saw Pattern


I made the clasp by hand using jewelry wire. I will buy a nicer clasp for the finished project.

This is the cut link that has not been sanded to round over the ends. Also the brad pivot has not had the head cut off.

The link has been rounded over and the brad head cut off.

The bracelet is cut from a 10" x 3/4" x 1/4" thick maple. You will need to reduce the number of links to fit the persons wrist. 11 links fits an average size wrist.

I experimented with different ways to keep the brad in the holes. I think the best solution is to only drill part way through the links so the brad can only be inserted from one side. This means you only have to cap one side. To seal the open end mix some epoxy and saw dust. Use a tooth pick to put the mixture in the open hole. Cut the brad so it inserts in with about 1/8" for the mixture.

This project requires some precision. The holes need to be drilled very straight. A drill press and a fence makes this easier. You need to cut the lines close so you don't cut into the drill holes. Just take your time and it will go okay. You might need to practice on a couple blanks before you get the technique down. No big deal the blanks are very small so not much is lost but time.



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Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Band Clock Scroll Saw Pattern


I have made all kinds of sports patterns and even a cheer leading pattern but I have never designed a band pattern. Salute to the young men and women that put that groove in Friday night football.



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2009 Albury-Wodonga Scroll Saw Weekend


The 2009 Albury-Wodonga Scroll Saw weekend was another great success this year. Months of preparations paid off and everyone had a great weekend. Jutta Vyner was kind enough to write up a document showing all the great projects and merriment. Download Document . The document is a bit large so I have included a few pictures from the event below.



























Thanks to everyone who turned out to make the event such a success. A special thank you to Jutta for documenting the event.

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Busy, busy, busy. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I know it's difficult for the untrained eye to see but I am hard at work in this picture. You just can not imagine the mental exertion involved in running the Scrollsaw Workshop. I spend hours a day in this position thinking up new patterns. My wife says the amazing thing is how I can do all this work with my eyes closed. Folks I'm a trained professional and you should not try this at home. I spent two years studying with Himalayan monks to perfect this dangerous technique.

I just wanted everyone to understand the reason I am so far behind on returning my email. It should be clear by now that I just don't have enough hours in the day. Don't worry though because I have purchased a trained monkey. The seller assures me that the monkey can do as much work as me.

3D Goblet Scroll Saw Pattern


If you want to practice your 3D scroll saw cutting skills this pattern is for you. The pattern is easy to cut but you do need to be precise. The hole in the top needs to be drilled dead center and you need to follow the pattern lines close.

The blank needs to be 1 1/2" x 1 1/2". Use a 3/4" forstner bit to drill the top before you apply the pattern. Make sure you mark the depth of the hole so you don't go too far.

I used a small piece of construction grade 2x4 and ripped it to 1 1/2". I used a vice to hold the piece on my drill press and drilled the hole. I then applied the pattern and carefully cut side one. Flip the piece to side two and continue to cut out the pattern.

If you have never done any 3D cutting before I have a couple of videos in the video library that explain the technique and how to make a 3D cutting jig if you like. The videos are from several months back but are good reference material for this project.

3D cutting jig video.
Basic 3D cutting video Part 1.
Basic 3D cutting video Part 2.

Important. This piece is not heavy enough to handle a candle. It is for decoration only.


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Monday, August 24, 2009

Flower Pot Stand Scroll Saw Pattern


New scrollers are always looking for thin stock for their scroll saw projects. Many designs require 1/2" or 1/4" wood. If you don't have a thickness planner this can be a problem. You can order thin wood online and that's a good option. You can try your local hardwood dealer but they generally don't sell thin stocks.

Most seasoned woodworkers would rather cut off their left thumb than buy wood from the big chain stores. They will tell you it's just too expensive and they don't have much selection. Both statements are true but as scrollers we work with small quantities of wood for most projects.

I put together this little flower pot stand for $3.28 for the wood and $2 for the flower pot. I went to Home Depot and purchased a 1/2" x 6" x 24" poplar board for $3.28. They sell 1/4", 1/2" and 3/4" boards in their hobby wood section. You can build all sorts of scroll saw projects from boards this size. You are limited to red oak and poplar but that's not as bad as it sounds.

Poplar looks fine for many scroll saw craft projects. Red oak is not my favorite wood to cut but it looks fine stained or just oiled.

Don't be put off of projects just because they require thin stock. It's great if you have a full work shop and can dimension your own stock but you can enjoy the hobby without all those tools.

The flower pot stand comes with several decorative figures for you to select. It is designed with slot and tab construction. If you cut carefully you can fit the pieces so they don't require glue. This make it easy to break them down for storage or shipping.




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Sunday, August 23, 2009

Fairy Clock Scroll Saw Pattern

Cut from 1/2" wood. Requires a 1 7/16" mini clock insert.

I know many of you had difficulties loading the links from yesterdays post. Looks like the server went down. As of this morning it seems to be back up so you might want to try again.



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Friday, August 21, 2009

How to be a sheep herder.




At one time or another most woodworkers think about selling their work. Some are looking to make a little extra cash to buy supplies. Some dream of doing their craft full time. Either way there is a big learning curve to do it well.

Someone gave me a piece of advice one time. They said if you want to learn to be a sheep herder hang around other sheep herders. Well the same thing goes for selling crafts.

David the owner of Tuliptree Crafts started documenting his pursuit of making a full time business out of his scroll saw crafts. He started a Blog and began posting almost daily about his travels on the craft circuit. He started blogging sometime in 2006. He has built an incredible wealth of information for anyone willing to spend the time going through his archives.

If you want to sell crafts, hang around other crafters who sell crafts. David would be a good crafter to hang out with. Check out Scroll Saw Blog


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Heart Shaped Candy Dish Scroll Saw Pattern


To make this heart shaped candy dish you will need to tilt the table of your scroll saw to produce a bevel cut. The wood for the bowl in the picture is 1 1/4" thick and I used an angle of 1 1/2" degrees.

The angle will vary depending on the thickness of the wood you use. Practice the correct angle by test cutting quarter sized circles in scraps of the same stock. You want to be able to push the plug out about half way. To make the bowl deeper decrease the angle. To make it more shallow increase the angle.

There are patterns for two sized dishes. The big pattern will make a dish about 8" wide like the one in the picture above.



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Thursday, August 20, 2009

Server Problems #$*&%$


The servers that host my patterns are down right now. 3:50 pm Eastern time 8/21/09. They are aware of the problem and are working to get them back up. Sorry for the problem.
















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Small wall clock scroll saw pattern


This small wall clock is just the thing for a new scrollers looking to build their first clock. It uses a 2 3/4" clock insert that you can buy at Woodcraft. Model #142320. The clock is only 9" tall and about 6" wide so you won't need much wood for the project either.

The construction is slot and tab so assembly is straight forward and easy. Once you take a look at the pattern you will see their are very few cut required. It uses 1/4" thick wood through out. You could build the clock from 1/4" Baltic birch ply or hardwood.




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This is the end of the daily posts. Keep scrolling for lot's more scrolls saw fun!