Sunday, February 27, 2011

Letter Opener Scroll Saw Pattern

Letter openers are easy to cut. Even with the widespread use of email we stll get enough snail mail to make them useful. I like to cut them from 3/8" thick wood but 1/4" works okay if that's what you have on hand. I like to use a spindle sander to sharpen the blade but a Dremel tool with a sanding wheel works okay. You need to take your time and get the bevel of the blade as accurate as possible.

I used a #1 scroll reverse blade for the project. The interior cuts a pretty small. A dense straight grained wood works best.


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Work Shop Clock.


The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.Make A Donation

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Which scroll saw blade should I use?


In this audio scroll saw tip I try to answer the question "Which scroll saw blade should I use?". If you are just getting started with the scroll saw listen to this audio tip and I think it will help you narrow down your selection. It really not as complicated as it seems.



Press the speaker icon to listen to the audio file.

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Thursday, February 24, 2011

Never Forgotten Scroll Saw Pattern.


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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Circle of Love Ornament Scroll Saw Pattern.




George North demonstration at the Gwinnett Woodworkers Association Meeting.

The four video's were posted on youtube by the Gwinnett Woodworkers Association. They feature George North discussing how to make the spiral candle sticks featured several months ago in Scroll Saw Woodworking and Crafts magazine. This is a long session so get some popcorn before you start. If you are interested in making one of these candle sticks you can find the pattern in the Fall 2009 issue 36 of Scroll Saw Woodworking and Crafts magazine.

For those of you reading this in the email newsletter you may not see the videos. Please visit my blog and scroll down to the daily post section.









The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.Make A Donation

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Butterfly Shadow Scroll Saw Pattern.




Correction to yesterdays "Happy Trails" pattern. The pattern was cut in the wrong place. When you try to splice the two parts together they won't line up. The corrected pattern has now been uploaded to the catalog. Please delete yesterdays pattern and download it again. Sorry for the trouble.


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Monday, February 21, 2011

Happy Trails Scroll Saw Pattern

This is a large pattern. It measures about 15 inches long 9 inches tall. It's going to take a pretty good size piece of wood to cut it out. A piece this size will definitely challenge your cutting skills.
Take your time with this one.

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Sunday, February 20, 2011

He's a Thinker.


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Saturday, February 19, 2011

Sometimes saying thank you is just not enough.

I have always wanted to update my free online pattern catalog. It was poorly laid out and had no categories to make it easier to find a pattern. It was terribly difficult to keep it updated with new patterns. I just could not find the time to put out all the effort to refresh it.

A while back a reader emailed me and offered help. I new it would be a pretty big task and to be honest I did not expect him to be able to take the time to get it done. Well I am very happy to say not only did he get it done he gave me everything I wanted and more.

Frank Carey is a retired computer hardware and software engineer. Frank started with mainframe computers back in the golden era of the 60's. That's before home pc's, Apple computers or our modern use if the internet. What better than to have a guy like that offer to help me out. He is a grandpa now with three grandchildren. Frank and his wife lived in San Diego on a sail boat for over 15 years before retiring and becoming a landlubber as he calls it.

Four years ago Frank retired and started scrolling. He has been a DIY kind of guy his whole life so scrolling was a natural hobby to get involved with. I consider myself very lucky that he started his new hobby and found my blog.

Frank and I sent many emails back and fourth talking about what the catalog should be like. I had some basic ideas that I wanted and needed. From there he took the bull by the horns and dove in feet first. After a few week he had a good platform chosen and we were looking good. Then the real challenge started. All the patterns had to be transferred and hand categorized. Several of the links needed to be checked against the thumbnails which added up to hours of work.

After all of Franks hard work I put the new catalog live tonight. We might still have a little tweaking to do here and there. Click the catalog picture above to see the new catalog in your browser. There is also a link to it on the left hand side of the blog.

Oh by the way what do you think Frank charged me for hours and hours of work? Zilch, zip, nada, nutten baby. I am truly one of the luckiest gu