Sunday, January 31, 2010

Be My Valentine Scroll Saw Pattern




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Friday, January 29, 2010

Sheila Landry Designs (Free Pattern)


I have a very special treat for you guys today. Sheila Bergner-Landry, Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks Magazine and owner of Sheila Landry Designs has generously contributed a beautiful pattern for the readers of the Scrollsaw Workshop.

Sheila is an artist/scrollsaw pattern designer. You have seen her work in Creative Woodworks and Crafts magazine. She has designed and published many wonderful patterns for sell on the web. Do yourself a favor and visit her website. I guarantee you will find something that interests you.

This incredible Easter Cross segmentation pattern will have your family and friends amazed at your woodworking skill. Sheila lays out the materials and steps needed to build the project with ease. She will introduce you to a color stain product from Saman that will give you the rich colors you see in the picture below.

After you finish this free pattern drop by Sheila's website and purchase one of her many beautiful patterns. While your there drop her an email and say hi.



The picture below is a See Creature. See Creatures are whimsical eyeglass holders. This is a pattern available on Sheila's Website that is sure to be a hit at craft fairs or with family and friends. As I write this article the pattern is on sale. The price is $3.95. The pattern includes full painting details. There are several different See Creatures available now with more to come.

Guys these have the potential for profit. Low material cost, reasonable production time and unique design equal sales with profit. Practice the painting until you can turn these out quickly and make several for your next show. Click to see the full line of See Creatures.


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Thursday, January 28, 2010

Easy candle cup and how to get thin wood for projects.

I am always looking for ways to use up small scraps of wood. This project fits the bill. A couple small pieces of wood and a candle purchased for $2 and you have a quick and easy project.

I use a lot of thin wood in my projects. I receive email all the time asking where to get thin wood. The best answer is usually not what they want to hear. If you plan to make the occasional project then its fine to buy thin lumber online. There a several places that sell wood for scroll sawyers.

However if you are going to enjoy the hobby as more than the occasional gift for someone then there is really only one answer. You need to have the tools to dimension your own stock. It's cheaper to buy rough lumber and make it into what you need.

Here is what I suggest. Start with a planner. A planner will let you take a piece of rough lumber and make it any thickness you need. Sounds great problem solved. Not really. The rub on planners is that they are very wasteful. If you need a 1/8" piece for a project and you start with 3/4" stock then most of that board ends up as saw dust.

Let's solve that problem. A band saw that is powerful enough to re-saw lumber is the answer. Re-sawing lumber means taking a board, standing it on edge and making two boards. These two boards will now be what ever thickness you need. Okay if the band saw will make the boards any thickness we need then why start with a planner?

Re-sawing lumber is considered a rough cut and the board will need to be either sanded or planed flat to remove the cut marks from the band saw. You can use a flat bed sander for this but they tend to me more expensive than planners on the low end.

The best combination is to re-saw with the band saw to rough thickness then plan the board to the desired final thickness. This is the most economical technique in the long run and the tools will pay for themselves. Depending on how much scrolling you do they can pay for themselves rather quickly.

Ryobi makes a serviceable planner in the $200 dollar range. It's not built for industrial use by any means but most scrollers will find it adequate. DeWalt makes a very nice planner but you can multiply the cost by 3.

The band saw is going to set you back a bit of cash and that's one reason I say start with the planner. The band saw you buy needs to be powerful enough to cut through six inches or more of wood. That really rules out all the low end band saws. It's best to be able to re-saw up to 12 inches but that is a real wallet buster. Jet and Grizzly both make band saws that are capable enough to re-saw 6 inch boards. You are talking about spending $400 to $600 for an acceptable saw.

I know this is a bunch of cash and not everyone wants to invest this much in a hobby. Perfectly understandable. If you are planning to sell your projects at craft shows or online then the economics just make sense to keep the costs of supplies as low as possible. The only way I know to do that is to dimension the stock from rough lumber.




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Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Videos by Carole Rothman

Here are three videos showing the beautiful scroll saw bowl techniques of Carole Rothman. Watch and learn. She has this technique perfected.

If you are reading this in the email newsletter you may not be able to see the videos. Please visit my blog and watch them there.







Click the book to purchase on Amazon.


The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.
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Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Lynda.com One Monthe Subscription Winner, John Baker.


The winner of the Subscription Giveaway was John Baker. John lives in Leicestershire United kingdom.

John has a couple of Hegner scroll saws that he puts to good use cutting beautiful puzzles for his website Waywood-Creations. John you sure look happy standing there in your workshop. It's funny, that's the way I feel after a long days work when I get in my shop also. Congratulations and I hope you enjoy the subscription.

Thanks to everyone who took the time to enter.

Monday, January 25, 2010

Working Widget Technology Custom Wood Inlays






A reader sent me an email a couple weeks ago asking if I had seen a product he saw advertised on the web. He told me about a company that sold small medallion sized wooden inlays that could be customized and used as a signature piece on woodworking projects.

It sounded interesting so I took a look at their site. The name of the company is Working Widget Technology. You can visit their site here. After looking around for a while I emailed the company for a sample.

I received the sample above. The wood choices are cherry, walnut and maple. They could not be more simple to inlay in your project. You use a 1 1/2" Forstner bit and drill to 1/8" depth. Glue in the medallion and finish. I like simple.

The product comes in three styles. Clip Art, Signature and Design Your Own. Each style gives you more or less customization. The Design Your Own lets you send you own artwork for laser etching.

I would say the product looks good. The walnut and Cherry seemed to show the laser etching better for some reason. I would have thought the light maple would have made the laser marks stand out but for some reason they looked lighter.

Now here is the catch. These things are expensive. The Clip Art kit which comes with six medallions and the forstner bit is $39.95. The Signature kit is $44.95 and the Design Your Own is a whopping $49.95. All the kits come with six medallions and the forstner bit. The difference is the amount of customization you can do.

At first I almost talked my self out of even reviewing the product because of the expense. Here is what changed my mind. There are certain projects you build that are special. A fretwork clock with hundreds of inside cuts that takes you weeks to complete. A baby crib for your first child or grand child. A commemorative plaque for a special event in your families life. These are projects that are worthy of a custom signature. I think in that situation I would be happy to use this product. Because of this I give this product a thumbs up.





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Reader Picture Post.

The first eight pictures are from Wes Brooks. These are very nice projects that anyone would be proud to display. Just look at the detail in the train. Thanks Wes for the inspiration.