Thursday, July 29, 2010

Work is for people who don't know how to fish!

Here is a sign you can make for the office of your favorite fisherman. You can add a few fishing lures to the sign to give it that little extra touch.

I'll be doing the drawing for the giveaway Saturday night. Make sure you get your entries in for a chance to win.


This months book giveaway is "Making Wooden Baskets on your Scroll Saw". This is one of my favorite books. I love basket patterns and the ones in this book are exceptional.

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Product review of the Olsen ScrollSanders.

In this video review I demonstrate the Olsen ScrollSanders. This product replaces the blade in your scroll saw with a sanding strip. The strip can then be used to power sand small hard to reach areas in your fretwork.

I will show the product in action and give you my pros and cons.

You can find the Olsen ScrollSanders at many woodworking stores. Here is the link to the product on the Woodcraft web site. Olsen ScrollSander


If you are reading this in the email newsletter you may not see the video. Please visit the blog and watch it in the daily post section.

The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.Make A Donation

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Crayon Hauler Scroll Saw Pattern. Holds 12 crayons.

There are a lot of ways to have fun in your workshop. One of the best is to work with a child or grandchild. The younger they are the shorter their attention span usually is. Very simple projects that they can help you with are the best for these young woodworkers. Just make sure you keep safety foremost in your thoughts as you work.

You won't get much more simple that this crayon hauler but you will end up with a project the child can enjoy. You will probably need to cut the body but the child can help assemble the wheels, paint and decorate as they like. Maybe even help drill all the holes for the crayons.

The truck is designed to be cut from a construction grade 2 x 4. The wheels are 1 1/4" diameter and can be cut from the pattern or purchased. You can buy the wheels from many craft and woodworking stores. I included a link to where you can buy them online.

I kept the truck in the picture above very simple but you can add fenders, head lights, spare tire, caution light, smoke stacks and anything else you or your youngster can think up. Remember to keep the age of the child in mind when adding parts that could come off and be swallowed.

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Monday, July 26, 2010

Praying Hands Cross Scroll Saw Pattern

This pattern was requested from a reader. The pattern requires a technique called veining. For those of you new to scrolling this is just making a cut in the wood that draws a line to enhance the image. To do this sometimes requires an interior hole to be drilled. This hole starts the vein/line.

You want to conceal the entry hole as much as possible. Use micro drill bits that are just big enough for the blade you plan to use. You can sometimes blend the entry hole into the line with your blade. I have even used the saw dust from the cutting mixed with a little glue to make a filler putty for the holes.

Veining shows up better on lighter wood. Using a larger blade will make the veining show up better because it leaves a wider kerf.

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Freedom to Run Scroll Saw Pattern.

The 2010 World Equestrian Games will be held in my home city, Lexington Ky. This will be the largest equestrian event ever held in the United States. The games are held every four years. Over 100 countries are involved in the events. Events this large can bring in millions of dollars to the area where the games are held.

Any time something like this happens it can be an excellent opportunity for craftsmen. You have to be careful not to violate any trademarked logos or slogans but with a little creativity you can make some money. I will probably design a few equestrian patterns and make some projects for the event. It's been a long time since I have done any production cutting but the opportunity is too good to pass up. I only have a couple months until the event so I won't be able to get a large inventory cut. I have talked to a couple establishments where tourist should be frequenting. They are at least willing to take a look at what I make so we will see what happens.


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Saturday, July 24, 2010

Murphy was an Optimist Scroll Saw Pattern.


Murphy's law says "Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong". I had one of those days today at work. It was one of those days when you say "Murphy was an optimist". It's nice to stay positive but some days you just have to give in to the Gods of negativity and kneel down to Murphy and give him his dues. The good news about a bad day is they are only possible if you know what a good day is. I had my bad day now I can look forward to a good day. I am pessimistically optimistic that tomorrow will be great.

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Friday, July 23, 2010

Corian.

After posting the Corian example the other day I have received several emails with tips and suggestions. Thanks for all the info. These pictures are from Barb Schmidt. She has cut many Corian projects and had tips to share. You can see the rest of her work here.

I will be trying several of the tips this weekend and see which work best for me. I'll let you all know the results.
One question I want to put out is sourcing for Corian. Other than hitting up local installers and ebay do any of you have a good online source for Corian? Because it is so expensive to buy and ship I would like to find someone selling small blanks targeted to crafters. Any ideas?

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Thursday, July 22, 2010

Chinese Pendants for Family, Love and Strength.

These Chinese character pendants make nice pieces of jewelry. The characters stand for family, love and strength. You will need to add a jump ring and chain and you have a quick gift.

You can also use the Inlace or polymer clay inlay technique I have discussed before to add a nice touch.

The scroll saw is great for jewelry making. You can make bracelets, rings, pendants and other items that look nice and are cheap and quick to finish.

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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Experimenting with Corian on the scroll saw.

I don't cut a lot of Corian. It's a fun product to work with because it's so different from wood. I decided I should spend a little time learning the ins and outs of cutting the product and making it look nice.

The first thing to know is that Corian can be expensive. It runs about $20/sf. The good news is that most scroll saw projects are small so you don't need a lot of the material. It's best to try and find your local counter top installer and buy or trade for their scraps. You can also find scraps of Corian sold on www.ebay.com. It's also heavy so shipping charges are high.

Using the correct blade is important. A skip tooth blade like the Flying Dutchman Polar blade will cut Corian well. I also used the "True Cut Blades Hook Tooth GT" with good results.

Feed rate and blade speed are also important. If you feed too fast you will cause friction heat and melt the Corian as you cut. This heat will fuse the material back together. You will know this has happened when you try to remove the piece from the waste area. It won't come out. Even using the correct feed rate you can get some fusing. In the test piece above I used packing tape over the pattern of the man but not on the base. I had no fusing with the tape but without it fusing occurred. This caused a lot of sanding to get the base edges smooth after I had to break it out of the waste. Always use the tape.

Sanding and polishing are a work in progress for me. You can see on the test piece above that there is a difference in the gloss from the pre-finished front and the edges I cut and sanded. It's not severe but noticeable up close. After researching online I have found that there are products to remove scratches and polish the Corian to a high gloss finish. Some online sources suggest a buffing wheel to get a really nice high gloss. I'm working on that.

Cyanoacrylate(Super Glue) is the glue for assembling Corian pieces together. In the test cut there is very little glue area between the base and the foot but the CA glue made the joint strong.

I love cutting wood. I like the natural beauty of the grain. I like the way it feels. I like the way it smells. I like the way it cuts. I just like wood but Corian gives us another material to add to our arsenal. Small art pieces, key fobs, name plates and desk sets are just a few of the projects that come to mind using Corian. If you get a chance, give it a try.




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Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Wixey Digital Angle Gauge Review.

This video is a quick review of the Wixey digital angle gauge. Here is the Woodcraft link to the purchase the tool.

If you are reading this in the email newsletter you may not see the video. Please visit the blog and watch it in the daily post section. You can also watch it here.



I know some of you are waiting for a reply to email. As usual I'm way behind. I'll try to work the rest of the week getting at least a little caught up. Thanks for understanding.

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Monday, July 19, 2010

The winners of the "Giveaway the Giveaway" contest.

Roger Covert was one of the two winners. Here is Roger with two of his other passions, his scooter and his beautiful granddaughter. Congratulations Roger.

Here is Richard Leighton, the other winner working away on his DeWalt scroll saw. Congrats to you also Richard. I'll get the packages in the mail tomorrow guys. Thanks to everyone for entering.

Six Inch Cheese Dome Scroll Saw Pattern.


This project requires a 6 inch glass dome. Sources are available for the dome in the pattern. Prices range from $8 to $13 for the dome depending on where you buy it. I found mine at the local Woodcraft store in the woodturners section. Woodcraft does not appear to carry the dome online. There is an online source available here. Their 6 inch dome is $8 plus shipping.

The plate in this project is cut from Corian. Make sure you use the correct blades when cutting the Corian. The Flying Dutchman #7 Polar blade works fine. It's also helpful to have some micro sanding pads but any 220 grit sand paper will give you pretty good results on the Corian if you need to sand the edges. Mine required very little sanding.

I attached the plate to the wood with two part epoxy.

If you have never cut Corian before you will be surprised how well it cuts with the right blade. Finding Corian can sometimes be difficult. Some sources are Ebay, and your local counter top installers. They often have scraps left over that they throw out. I also know a woodworker in Tennessee that might be a source but I'm not sure of the price yet.

Corian is food safe a reasonably durable. It can be cleaned with ordinary dish washing detergent. It is now porous so it does not hold odors.


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Sunday, July 18, 2010

It's giveaway time again.

The videos below are the drawings for the giveaways.




If you are reading this in the email newsletter you may not see the videos. Please visit the blog and watch them there.



This is a three layered pattern. Use contrasting 1/2" or 1/4" thick woods for each layer.

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Friday, July 16, 2010

Simple bud vase holder scroll saw pattern.

Easy to cut bud vase holder. You can use the inexpensive bud vase from Wildwood Designs. They come in three different colors and only cost .45 apiece.

I will be doing the drawing for the "Making Wooden Baskets on the Scroll Saw" book Saturday evening. I will also draw for the "Giveaway the Giveaway" contest the same time. Make sure you get your entries in for both. Look for the video of the drawings sometime Saturday night.

The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.Make A Donation


Thursday, July 15, 2010

One last post on the SAW EXPO 2010.

If you are reading this in the email newsletter you may not see the video. Please visit the blog and watch it there.

I put together a short video showing many of the sights at the SAW EXPO last weekend. This will end the content from the show and I'll get back to making some patterns for you guys. I just want to thank the people at SAW one more time. I had a great time and I know how hard you guys worked to put the show together. I also want to say hi to everyone I had the opportunity to meet at the show. Thanks for taking the time to stop and talk. I had a blast meeting all of you.

The Scrollsaw Workshop is primarily supported by donations. If you enjoy this Blog and would like to make a donation please click this link. Your support is greatly appreciated.Make A Donation

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Nice deal from Amazon on Corel Draw X4 Home/Student version.



This is not an ad. I don't get any money from this I just wanted to pass on a deal I just found. A reader was looking for an older version of Corel Draw to design scroll saw patterns. I was telling him about the Home/Student version and that it might also be an option for him. When I went to Amazon to check prices I noticed it had been marked down from $129 to $69 with free shipping.

They are likely clearing out X4 because X5 is shipping now. If you have ever thought about using a high end vector graphics program to design patterns this might be a good opportunity. Don't buy this unless you are ready to spend the time to learn it. It requires a little effort like all high end software. The more computer skills you already have the quicker you will catch on. This is the program I use for all my patterns.

At the time I am posting this it is in stock and shipped from Amazon.

You can take a look here. Corel Draw X4 Home/Student.


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How I Roll Scroll Saw Pattern


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Giveaway the Giveaway.